Fashion Resolutions for the Year 2013

With every New Year, there come 365 new days—365 new chances for making a fashion statement. Three-hundred and sixty-five new days for confronting the world with an identity crafted by the precise tailoring of a skirt, by the unusual color of a blouse. For the year 2013, a year some people never imagined we would reach, I have made five resolutions that I intend to honor. My five resolutions focus on the ways I have worn clothing and the possibility for re-inventing certain elements of my style.

  1. Expand my color palette beyond a shade.
  2. Embrace at least one new texture: velvet.
  3. Try a T-Shirt.
  4. Go vintage without looking too far.
  5. Abide by the motto: “I am what I wear.”

Expand my color palette beyond a shade.  Whenever someone asks me about my favorite color, I always say black, an answer that would quickly be followed by a snarky comment, such as “Black is not a color. It’s a shade.” While I still maintain that black is and probably always will be my color of choice, I have noticed that my wardrobe has a redundant number of black dresses, shirts, and boots. To celebrate the New Year, I want to expand my color palette beyond black and indulge in some unexpected colors.

Papaya Vionnet Gown

Papaya Vionnet Gown

Bordeux Dress

Bordeux Dress

Images courtesy of http://www.shopbop.com

White-Gold Dress

White-Gold Dress

Image courtesy of http://www.lulus.com

Embrace at least one new texture: velvet. I’ve always played it safe when it comes to textures, and when I venture into new territories, I tend to choose the safer options. However, I’ve always wondered if velvet, which I usually associate with frumpy, less modern styles, can become new for me. After scouring the Internet, I’ve found that the best velvet looks are ones that emphasize the romance of velvet and downplay the formal nature of the texture, like this burgundy velvet dress and J.Crew t-shirt.

Mink Pink Snow Palace Cutout Burgundy Velvet Dress

Mink Pink Snow Palace Cutout Burgundy Velvet Dress

Image courtesy of http://www.lulus.com

Deep Blue Velvet Tee

Image courtesy of http://www.jcrew.com

Speaking of t-shirts, I’ve decided that for my third resolution, I am going to try a t-shirt.  Aside from the gym and the airplane, I refrain from wearing t-shirts in public. I suppose they always seem so basic and boring to me. And if I do wear a t-shirt, I’ve usually added two or three layers on top of the initial garment. This year, however, I want to try wearing a t-shirt and letting it speak for itself. I’ve recently found some t-shirts that express both my inner book-nerd and love for Game of Thrones.

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Images courtesy of http://www.threadless.com

Go vintage without looking too far. By vintage, I mean old, and by old, I mean the past three or four years. Recently, a friend of mine pointed out a dress that I hadn’t worn in at least two years. Paired with some cowboy boots and a necklace, the dress became a new look. Instead of buying a whole new wardrobe, I’ve decided to re-asses what I never wear and create new looks from my old apparel.

Abide by the motto: “I am what I wear.” After attending UNC’s fall sustainable fashion show, I’ve been thinking more pointedly about the ways in which my clothes are made. I’ve started to search for sustainable or environmentally friendly clothing stores in the area that don’t sacrifice style for a conscious soul. I came upon a small store in Brightleaf, Durham, named vert &vogue, and I immediately fell in love with their super-chic, environmentally friendly clothing.

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Images courtesy of http://www.vertandvogue.com/index.php

Now that I’ve made my New Years fashion resolution, what are yours? They don’t have to be drastic resolutions, and some of the fashion elements can already exist in your wardrobe. Just think about the concept of re-shaping your style for all the days left in 2013.

 

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Fashion Inspiration of the Day: Lillian Bassman

Around this time of year, I find myself settling into the mundane cycle of school life. School has been in session for months already, Christmas break rife with relaxation and twinkling lights is almost here, and the weight of impending exams and papers has significantly increased. As a result, my sense of fashion has also fallen into a rut. I’ve found myself settling into a daily pattern: boots, jeans, sweater, and scarf. It’s not that I don’t have time to think about an outfit—I just feel uninspired. So in the hope of curing an enduring sense of ennui, I looked to fashion idols, photographs, and the people around me. After searching for a source of inspiration, I found mine in a series of photographs by Lillian Bassman.

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Image courtesy of http://nytimes.com

Bassman died earlier this year at the age of 94, and for most of her life, she was known as a master of fine-art photography. Bassman was a true New York woman: she was born in Brooklyn, grew up in the Bronx, and studied in Manhattan. Her life changed when she became an unpaid apprentice at Harper’s Bazaar in 1941, as she would go on to become one of the magazine’s top photographers. A true artist, Bassman experimented with lighting, contrast, and the willowy forms of her models to create beautiful, dreamy portraits of women who seem almost abstracted.

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Images courtesy of http://www.coolhunting.com

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Image courtesy of http://mediabistro.com

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Images courtesy of http://ananasamiami.com

Bassman, however, was known most famously, or infamously, for destroying almost all of her commercial negatives in 1969 after becoming disgusted by the models and changing aesthetics of the fashion industry. Later in life, Bassman would re-interpret her remaining negatives with further experimentation and revisit what made her so popular in the first place.

Despite the vicissitudes of her career, I have felt the power of her photography. Many of the images are simply breathtaking, and looking at them is like stumbling upon a hazy dream of remarkable fashion and remarkable women. Hopefully, these photographs can serve to inspire anyone who is currently suffering from this listless sense of ennui.

XOXO, Gossip Girl’s Final Fashion Show

Gossip Girl’s sixth and final season is coming to a close, signaling the end of an era characterized by schoolgirl headbands and scandalous affairs. While the show’s drama has been the main source of attraction, many of us come back for the clothes. Eric Damian, the show’s stylist, has cultivated the wardrobes of each star to perfection over the past six seasons. And even if the outfits border on ridiculous at times, causing many to question whether or not a seventeen-year-old in high school would ever wear such clothes, this is the Upper East Side. And the two queen bees of the Upper East Side, Serena and Blair, rule their fashion empire. From their time at Constance Billard School for Girls, to their trip to Paris, and to their final appearances in season six, it’s clear that their clothes have become characters of their own. Although Serena and Blair’s love lives may take center stage at times, their friendship has always been the strongest and most compelling relationship of the show. In celebration of that friendship and the final season, let’s take a look back at the stories their clothes have created.

Image courtesy of http://www.collegefashion.net/fashion-tips/how-to-dress-like-blair-waldorf/

Image courtesy of http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/serena-van-der-woodsen?before=1335876784

In the early days, Serena and Blair were restricted to wearing uniforms, but the two put their own spin on the classic plaid and starched white shirt. Blair defined her style through ladylike tailored blouses and colorful headbands while Serena opted for a sexier, more laidback style.

Image courtesy of http://jolie-petitefille.blogspot.com/2010/09/introduction.html

Image courtesy of http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/serena-van-der-woodsen/images/1321045/title/serena-van-der-woodsen-photo

Even outside of school, both Serena and Blair used their clothes to showcase their personalities. Blair stuck to classic silhouettes that reflected her obsession with Audrey Hepburn, and Serena chose more casual yet effortlessly cool clothes to represent her free-spirited personality.

Image courtesy of http://www.instyle.com/instyle/package/general/photos

Image courtesy of http://lifeisroyalty.blogspot.com/2010/11/you-know-you-love-this-d.html

By the time season two rolled around, the girls were still choosing clothes that matched their styles from season one. Always youthful and fun, their outfits at the White Party in the first episode of season two were particularly memorable.

Image courtesy of http://www.buddytv.com/articles/gossip-girl/gossip-girl-season-3-premiere-30920.aspx

Image courtesy of http://coffeefashionandtv.blogspot.com/2011/12/how-to-dress-like-serena-van-der-woodsen.html

Season three was a confusing time for these two ladies, as they settled into college, Serena indulged in an affair with a married man, and Blair had incredibly dramatic relationship problems with a certain Chuck Bass. Their wardrobes reflected this fluctuating state, as Blair lost the headband but still retained some of her immaturity from high school. And Serena started wearing more sophisticated looks but maintained her upper-crust boho-chic vibe.

Image courtesy of http://www.posh24.com/gossip_girl/gossip_girl_takes_on_paris

Image courtesy of http://neverenuffstuff.com/2010/09/gossip-girl-fashion-episode-1-season-4.html

By season four, however, there was a change. The dresses became more sophisticated, the accessories more impressive, and the shoes even higher. Perhaps this reaction stems partially from their amazing style during their trip to Paris. While Blair perfected her use of color and patterning without ever seeming gauche, Serena balanced dressing sexy with tailored blazers or funky accessories.

Image courtesy of http://screencrave.com/2011-11-22/gossip-girl-season-5-episode-8-all-the-pretty-sources-tv-review/

The clothing of season five showcased Blair as a princess-to-be and Serena in more sophisticated dresses. Take a look at their evolved styles with this snapshot of the two at Blair’s wedding shower.

Image courtesy of http://www.wetpaint.com/gossip-girl/articles/gossip-girl-season-6-will-blair-and-serena-ever-be-friends-again-poll

Flash-forward to season six and it’s apparent that Blair and Serena are no longer teenagers. Blair still mixes her colors and patterns but in more demure silhouettes. Serena, on the other hand, still dresses in her customary sexy style, but the more bohemian aspect of her style has disappeared and in its place is a more sophisticated taste.

Image courtesy of http://coffeefashionandtv.blogspot.com/2011/12/how-to-dress-like-serena-van-der-woodsen.html

Images courtesy  of http://fashionasliterature.wordpress.com/tag/style/

And finally, my two favorite outfits from the show’s entire run. Nothing makes a statement quite like Serena’s grey lace Zuhair Murad dress or Blair’s red ruffled Oscar de la Renta gown.

Fashion for a Better World: Creating Change in the Triangle Area

Fashion can tell the stories of who we are and who we want to be. When you wear a bold dress or a piece of jewelry handed down to you by a grandmother, you are not simply trying on meaningless objects. The pieces transform when you wear them—that skin-to-fabric contact creates a bond—a fantasy, a reality. On a less personal note, fashion can tell us about the cultural and social norms of a time. Yves Saint Laurent’s 1966 tuxedo suit, Le Smoking, made a strong statement about female power, as it was the first popular tuxedo suit for women. Similarly, in 2001, Alexander McQueen’s Spring/Summer show, Voss, questioned the modeling industry’s obsession with creating a standard formula for female beauty. Thus, fashion has an impact on the way we feel, think, and see.

However, popular cultural and a majority of the world seem to have one view of the fashion industry, a view filtered through the lens of such phenomenon as The Devil Wears Prada. This image of the fashion industry consists of a cold, snobby, and cutthroat consumerist realm based in New York and inaccessible to the rest of the world. But if the fabulous designers from Friday night’s Fashion for a Better World show have anything to say about it, that perception of the fashion industry will be shattered. A part of UNC’s larger Global Entrepreneurship Week, Fashion for a Better World emphasized the power of rising female entrepreneurs and the growing market of sustainable fashion in the Research Triangle. Hosted by Symbology, a label that uses fashion to empower female artisans, the event showcased works by six different female designers. Additionally, Brooks Bell, founder of an enterprise-level testing and optimization firm, spoke about her experience as a female entrepreneur and the necessity of taking small risks to build confidence. Mor Aframian, from Redress Raleigh, also celebrated the modern female entrepreneur in her speech about the emergence of a sustainable fashion industry in North Carolina.

But it was the surprise celebrity guest speaker of the night, five-time Grammy nominee Nnenna Freelon who so eloquently captured the spirit of the entire night: “It’s not just about looking cute, it’s about spreading the love and the wealth and the beauty…So we can all feel good on multiple levels.” Nnenna also spoke to the notion of creating this sustainable fashion industry right here in North Carolina when she succinctly stated, “Bloom where you are planted.” You don’t have to go to New York, Milan, or Paris to interact with fashion. There’s an entire fashion industry blooming in the Research Triangle, and during Fashion for a Better World, the audience was finally able to witness it. And what I saw was not just any fashion but fashion with heart. Fashion grounded in social and environmental consciousness.

The first designer to send her looks down the runway was Oami Powers, founder of the contemporary clothing line, Judah Ross. Powers noted the importance of personal history in her edgy and eclectic designs. On her decision to go green as a designer, Oami said, “You want to feel good about the clothes you are wearing, you don’t want to feel like you’re having a really detrimental effect on the planet…” A true believer in the Slow Fashion movement, Oami emphasized the need for quality over quantity in her designs. This quality was evident in all her pieces from the night. One particular stunner was this hand-dyed watercolor skirt, no doubt influenced by Powers’ background as a painter. Oami’s attention to fabric and color can also be seen in her other dresses.

Photographs courtesy of Josh Kongmany

Following Powers’ Judah Ross was Kim Kirchstein of Leopold Designs. Motivated by a love for shape, pattern, and texture, Kirchstein has created gorgeous scarves for Leopold Designs in the past but notes that she is now making more of a transition to wearable garments. Her collection vibrated with color and intricate patterns.

Photographs courtesy of Josh Kongmany

This skirt with its blue swirling pattern was beautiful, and Kirchstein’s final look, a fiery dress, was a showstopper. Kirchstein’s clothes had an easy, flowing feel to them, but the colors and patterns kept the designs sharp. On her desire to pursue sustainable fashion, Kirchstein said, “The health of the entire planet is affecting people more on an individual basis [now]…”

Next up on the runway was Mamafrica, founded by Ashley Nemiro, a current PhD student who splits her time between school in Chapel Hill and Mamafrica in the Democratic Republic Congo. This non-profit organization takes a holistic approach to changing the lives of internally displaced women in the DRC who are often victims of sexual violence. Nemiro emphasizes that fashion “is one component, but it’s not the biggest.” Nemiro’s team also teaches health literacy and offers counseling for the Mamas of Mamafrica. The actual creation of clothing is part of the organization’s efforts to create economic opportunities for these women. Of the clothing, Nemiro comments, “All of our stuff is very unique. Everything is one-of-a-kind.” Set against Alicia Keys’ “Girl is on Fire,” the colorful and patterned garments that came down the runway showcased this spirit of individuality. But Nemiro emphasizes that the program not only celebrates individuality but also the creation of community: “It’s important that I know every single woman’s name who comes through the program…Once a woman has come through Mamafrica, she’s always a Mama.”

Photographs courtesy of Josh Kongmany

After Mamafrica’s vividly colorful designs came the softer, earthy hues of Organicality, an eco-lifestyle company dedicated to selling products that contain only organic and sustainable fibers certified under Fair Trade conditions. Carrie Huitt Rueben, the founder of Organicality, has become a leader in sustainable fashion, and her chic collection of laid-back knits was perfect for fall and perfect for the environmentally conscious. Bags and wallets from Callie Brauel’s non-profit, A Ban Against Neglect, completed Organicality’s outfits. A Ban Against Neglect is a non-profit organization based in Accra, Ghana that helps girls off the street in Accra and recycles the plastic bags that litter Accra’s roads. By teaching girls how to sew bags made out of these plastic bags and other materials, ABAN provides a financial boost and an environmental boost to the community of Accra, Ghana.

Photographs courtesy of Josh Kongmany

Marissa Heyl of Symbology closed the fashion show with her Fall 2012 collection. Titled Peacocks and Paisleys, this collection’s crisp patterns, modern silhouettes, and interesting cutout designs created a dynamic set of looks. For example, the flair of this dress and the bright color made for a stunning opening piece. Another favorite of mine was this patterned dress that could easily translate from day to night.

Photographs courtesy of Josh Kongmany

Finally, this modern red dress with an interesting cutout stole the show for me. To round out the collection, performers danced to Beyonce’s “Run the World (Girls),” creating an atmosphere of high energy and female strength.

Heyl founded Symbology with the intention of empowering women and creating a source of income for artisans in developing countries. Named because of Heyl’s interest in how symbols are imbued with cultural meaning, Heyl explains the thinking behind Symbology: “[Symbology is] not only a thread that connects us as humans but is interested in the symbolic nature of our dresses, our pieces…Every dress tells a story, something that connects women, empowering women, celebrating art forms that are dying, providing customers with works of art.”

Heyl uses textiles made by artisans in India and provides these artisans with a steady demand and fair income. Her innovative approach to fashion has changed the way in which we view sustainable fashion. In this case, Heyl has created sustainable relationships with artisans in India. She noted how larger companies like Anthropologie sometimes partner with poorer artisans, but after using these artisans, the companies leave. So no permanent solution to their lack of income has been established. Symbology, on the other hand, thrives on these close relationships. Heyl explained that being on the ground and talking to people in these developing countries has served as the basis of her professional relationships with the artisans.

Marissa Heyl’s commitment to creating communities focused on bettering the world through fashion has resulted in not only Symbology but also Friday’s Fashion for a Better World. Heyl brought together a group of women in North Carolina to show how amazing female collaboration can be. The night also solidified the importance of creating fashion to sustain the world and the people who live in it. Most of all, the night allowed me a glimpse of an alternate fashion universe, one where fashion tells the stories of who we are and who we will be. One where snobby exclusivity is replaced by heart and a desire to see change in the world.

Hurricane Sandy: A Model’s Mistake

Hurricane Sandy has wrecked havoc along the Northeast, to the extent that she is known as the largest Atlantic Hurricane on record. The storm caused the deaths of at least eleven people and resulted in power outages and destroyed homes. This kind of chaos is serious, but recently, the story of a model, Hurricane Sandy, and an inappropriately timed photo shoot has become predominant in the news. The model’s name is Nana Gouvea, and she decided to pose with the wreckage of Hurricane Sandy in the backdrop: broken cars, fallen trees, and a stormy sky. Gouvea looks at the camera in a variety of sexily charged positions without apology. The model, whose husband snapped the shots, reportedly likes storms because they give her time to spend with her husband. Her weak excuse for her love of storms, however, has caused instant backlash.

The model poses in all her glory. Photo courtesy of http://www.huffingtonpost.com.

And understandably so. Many people have called out Gouvea on her lack of sensitivity to the victims of the Hurricane Sandy, as people have lost their lives and their homes. Dissenters of the overwhelmingly negative reactions to the photographs seem to maintain the following mantra: she isn’t hurting anyone, so what’s the big deal? The big deal can be broken down into two main reasons. The first, and most important, is that these photographs represent how desensitized people can become to tragedy. The ability to empathize with others, to feel deeply for someone else’s plight, makes us human. What Gouvea shows, however, is monstrosity. Whether or not she was aware of the implications of her photo shoot at the time, she is essentially re-appropriating an event, a setting of brokenness and loss, so that it becomes a setting for “looking good.” This supreme selfishness and lack of empathy makes the photo shoot monstrous and her actions less than human.

Those affected by Hurricane Sandy wait in line to collect water and food from a center on Coney Island. Photo courtesy of http://blog.zap2it.com.

Secondly, the “big deal” about Gouvea’s photo shoot is the light that in which it portrays the fashion industry. While this was not a photo-shoot done by any professional photographer or created for a magazine, its medium is associated with fashion. Additionally, many newspapers categorized articles concerning the incident as fashion stories. For example, ABC News’ story on Gouvea, “Model Nana Gouvea Uses Sandy Wreckage for Photo Shoot,” was placed under their “Fashion” headline. In light of the negativity that the industry usually generates, this kind of attention is unwanted. Many people view the fashion industry as frivolous, expensive, and almost insular from the rest of the world. And Gouvea’s photographs exemplify this attitude that the fashion industry does not want and frankly cannot afford.

A screen shot of the ABC News story on Gouvea. Photo courtesy of http://abcnews.go.com.

The Perfect Fall Accessory

Temperatures have cooled considerably in the past few weeks—days that once fluctuated between hot and cool have now descended into slightly warm and cold. With the newly settled chill of fall, keeping warm is imperative. However, walking in and out of rooms of varying temperature, waking up to a cold morning but encountering a warmer afternoon, and changes in wind all affect our levels of warmth during the day. So layering becomes key during the fall, and the perfect fall layer is also an extremely fashionable accessory: the scarf. When deciding to wear a scarf, make the conscious choice not to simply throw any plain cloth around your neck. Pick out scarves with particular patterns, textures, and styles that make an outfit truly stand out, and experiment with different ways of tying a scarf to mix up your looks throughout the week. Below are 10 fun, interesting, and chic scarves to try out this fall.

Image courtesy of http://usa.hermes.com

To start off this list is the most classic of all scarves: the Hermès silk scarf. The French luxury brand is renowned for its sophisticated scarves that epitomize taste. This particular Casques et Plumets scarf mixes bright colors into delightful images.

Image courtesy of http://usa.hermes.com

This Kilim scarf, worn as a headdress here, is also classic Hermès. Try to emulate this style by wearing your hair down and wrapping a silk scarf across the top of your head. This slightly offbeat style is not only a standout, but it can also keep the front of your head warm!

Image courtesy of http://www.madewell.com

With Hermès scarves comes a hefty price, however, so for scarves in a lower budget range, try out Madewell. The new collection of Madewell storyteller scarves mirrors the sophistication of Hermès scarves without the same price tag. This black and white storyteller scarf from Madewell has a beautiful graphic pattern that could potentially be worn with many different outfits.

Image courtesy of http://www.brooksbrothers.com/

I love this cable cowl neck scarf from Brooks Brothers—it fits the All-American style of the brand but offers a unique blend of textures (lambswool and silk). This infinity style scarf is a popular one for this fall, so why not put your own spin on the style with a mixed texture scarf.

Image courtesy of http://shop.nordstorm.com

This Michael Kors toggle neck warmer scarf is on this list for two reasons. First, the color is absolutely gorgeous and appropriate for fall. Second, the toggle clasp sets this scarf apart from others, adding an interesting design element that gives this scarf a laid-back but chic feel.

Image courtesy of http://shop.nordstorm.com

Oblong scarves are also extremely popular for Fall 2012. This Eyeful Embroidered scarf has such a great blend of neutral colors with pops of pink and orange. The pattern is interesting, and the fullness of the scarf allows for all different kinds of scarf tying.

Image courtesy of http://shop.nordstorm.com

For a sleeker look, try this Nicole Miller optical gradation silk scarf. This look is definitely unique and noteworthy for its tricky patterning.

Image courtesy of http://shop.nordstorm.com

This Alexander McQueen tulip skull scarf works so well for this time of year, especially on a slightly warmer but still cool fall day. The playful pattern of skull and flowers creates a striking look.

Image courtesy of http://www.anthropologie.com

For much chillier days, try out this greyscale fringed loop scarf from Anthropologie. This particular scarf incorporates the fringe trend and will help you stay warm between classes.

Image courtesy of http://www.asos.com

Finally, this Spratters & Jayne Infinity Chain Scarf will also keep you toasty throughout the day. Designer Rachael Warner uses ultra-chunky Peruvian Highlands wool to create her fashionable scarves.

Image courtesy of http://shop.nordstrom.com/c/scarf-video?origin=leftnav

If you want to find out more ways you can tie your scarves, check out this great video from Nordstrom. The instructional film illustrates all different kinds of scarf knots, from the “cowgirl knot” to more classic ties.

Fall Foliage for the Wardrobe

Autumn has been in full swing for a little less than a month, but one key factor seems to be missing—fall foliage. As a native of Chapel Hill, I expect the usual blend of vibrant red, orange, and yellow around this time of year. However, I have found that there is a dearth of fall colors around campus this year. I trample over dead leaves everyday, but I don’t actually see the beautiful mix of colors that usually evokes Halloween, Thanksgiving, and apple cider. Although this lack of fall ambience is disappointing, especially when I see friends from New Jersey posting pictures of fall foliage at its best, I have decided that the best cure for the lack of color is to incorporate fall into my wardrobe.

Let’s start with the reds. A particularly popular fall color this year is oxblood. Deemed the “it” color for this fall, Megan Buerger, a writer for The Washington Post, says, “Some see it as a deep red with splashes of purple and blue, nearing burgundy or berry. Others see it injected with chocolate brown and closer to the color of, well, blood. It’s everywhere in fashion this season, from chunky waffle scarves to shiny leather dresses, as dark as a plum lipstick and as light as a sheer merlot.” AllSaints Spitalfields, the British retailer based in London, has made particularly good use of the color in their fall collection. Try this oxblood dress or this oxblood biker jacket from AllSaints for an unconventional take on the casual dress and the leather jacket. And although there are no AllSaints stores located in North Carolina, their online shopping department is great, and shipping is free within the US.

Images courtesy of http://www.usallsaints.com

If you want to wear a brighter shade than oxblood, add a pop of cherry red or pink-red to your wardrobe. All you need to do is add an accessory in one of these shades, like this great scarf from Madewell, a store that recently opened at Southpoint Mall. I love the interesting print on this scarf and the bright red may seem unusual for fall, but it still works in small doses.

Image courtesy of http://www.madewell.com

As for orange, look no further than this autumn appropriate outfit from Madewell’s big sister brand, J.Crew. The lighter orange blazer layered over the deeper orange sweater is chic but laid-back. Blazers are a definite must for the fall, and this slim-fitting blazer combined with the festive sweater makes for a perfect orange outfit.

Image courtesy of http://www.jcrew.com

Finally, embrace yellow this fall by experimenting with yellow boots. Although unorthodox, yellow boots can make your outfit a standout. For instance, these yellow moccasin boots are not for the faint of heart, but they make a statement with their unusual coloring and decorative beading.

Image courtesy of http://www.shopbop.com

If you’re feeling a little less daring, try out these soft yellow-brown boots.

Image courtesy of http://shop.tsum.ru

And if it’s raining, try out these not so mellow yellow rain boots.

Image courtesy of http://habituallychic.blogspot.com/2008/03/not-so-mellow-yellow.html